The Lynch List, 24-Jun-2011

First: No use trying to do good with the devil’s tools. Or that’s what a late ancestor of mine once said.

The Catholic Civil Rights League is launching a complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal over the firing of Damian Goddard for his tweeted comments in support of traditional marriage. While I would much rather it not be launched at all, this is an interesting test case to see if the Tribunal will apply the same rigour as it does when the shoe is on the other foot.

Second: Big surprise. “The Canadian Human Rights Commission opposes such a limitation on our jurisdiction,” says acting CHRC commissioner David Langtry when the government tries to put a lid on their activism. He claims that the Canadian Human Rights Act can be used to ensure that aboriginals get the same services from the federal government as non-aboriginals get from their provincial governments.

Sure, they can hold that position. Right after they approve my complaint for the fact that non-aboriginals pay more taxes than aboriginals do. Good for the goose…

Third: The BC Human Rights Tribunal might be called upon to defend the participants in Vancouver’s Stanley Cup riot from their employers.

Rilkoff said he doesn’t expect to see many riot-related firings put forward to the BC Human Rights Tribunal, given the demographic involved in last week’s riot.

Demographic? You mean they’re mostly young, male, and white? Rilkoff qualified his statement:

“We’re talking about primarily young people who are in lower-paying jobs and who will not have that many years of service,” he said.

Funny, I thought the Commissions were there precisely to defend the little guy. My bad.

Fourth: A good summary of Canada’s tepid commitment to free speech by Adam Daifallah:

In Canada, for instance, freedom of speech is not constitutionally guaranteed to the same degree it is in America. And those wishing for a glimpse into how forces sympathetic to Islamism will try to influence (read: stifle) public debate about the Muslim faith should be aware of recent Canadian experiences.

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